Internet Router Not Working

Internet Router Not Working” “I can not stream video from my phone to my HDTV.” “My tablet will not connect to my router” These are simply a couple of many common problems users encounter with their home networks and wireless connections. Why?

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Because even though your router is among the most useful tech devices you have, it may also be among the most troublesome. Establishing a home router–and keeping it running–remains more complex and requires much more tech knowledge than the average user may desire. Luckily, we can help.

Internet Router Not Working

The first step is knowing what your router is and how it functions. A router performs two principal functions. It routes data packets between networks. Second, it functions as a wireless access point, sharing the inbound online connection with all devices on a home network. A router is a central figure in a home network, connecting the huge Internet with our relatively tiny (yet increasingly complex) private networks.

That’s a complicated set of duties for a small, cheap device to carry out. Most routers have the ability to do these tasks reasonably well the huge majority of this time. But, because each one of these functions is crucial to some router’s network, as soon as your router starts to act up, you are likely to overlook the fact that it functioned perfectly for months, or even weeks, at a time.

Internet Router Not Working

How to Fix: Internet Router Not Working

Along with your router will act up, from time to time. Alas, the bridges between the Internet and a home user’s local area network, or LAN, are the ideal breeding ground for a lot of problems.

Not having the ability to browse the world wide web, intermittent connections drops, and dead spots in wireless coverage are simply a small section of the endless litany of migraine-inducing Wi-Fi weirdnesses that crop up when routers fail in their tasks.

You have the ability to address lots of these problems, even in the event that you cringe at the notion of troubleshooting your wireless network. I have covered many specific problems associated with wireless networks:

How to Boost Your Wireless Signal, How to Cast Out Intruders on a Wireless Network, and even How to Troubleshoot iPad Wi-Fi Connectivity Issues.

However, some issues that crop up are common to all wireless routers, and we worldzine want you to have the ability to solve them. Here are the twelve most popular wireless questions I get from readers, with corresponding down-and-dirty troubleshooting tricks you can try before you call technical support.

My New Router Won’t Connect to the Internet

The Problem: You buy a new router. You disconnect the router, connect the new one, and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation. Despite the fact that it is possible to see the new wireless network and may even connect your personal computer or device, you can’t browse the Internet.

Internet Router Not Working

Quick Fix: Unplug the network cable (or cables) and electricity in the broadband modem you obtained from your ISP such as the coaxial or DSL connection, in addition to all cables in the new router. Leave everything unplugged and simmer for at least 30 minutes.

Then reconnect the coaxial cable, DSL, or FiOS connection to the broadband modem, making sure it is securely in place and wait until the WAN/Internet light is on. Then, attach all cables back to your router (like the Ethernet cable in the broadband modem into the router’s WAN interface) and power the router back on. Make sure that the online connection activity light is on.

Doing these measures forces the modem to flush any information it’s holding onto from the previous router. Consider browsing the Internet. If you still can not, go through the router installation instructions again, now that you’ve reset the broadband modem.

The Wireless Network’s Name/SSID Disappeared

The Problem: All of a sudden, your SSID or Wi-Fi network name is no longer recorded when you click to see available wireless networks. There are numerous reasons this might occur, and it is not an unusual occurrence.

Quick Fix: Force your computer or device to connect to the router even if it isn’t broadcasting. From Windows, go into Control Panel | Network and Internet | Network, and Sharing | Manage Wireless Networks.

If you see your wireless network recorded, right-click on its icon and click on Properties. Check the option “Connect even when the system isn’t broadcasting its name (SSID).”

If you do not see your wireless network listed, click “Insert” then choose “Manually connect to a wireless network” and place your wireless data in.

Mac users: You can even “force-join” an SSID that’s ceased broadcasting by using a Mac’s Airport Utility. Select to combine “Other” and type in the name of the password and network.

Needless to say, you still need to discover why your SSID stopped broadcasting. Check to make certain broadcasting wasn’t accidentally disabled in the router’s software, reboot the router, and check for any software upgrades.

My Internet Connection Keeps Dropping

The Problem: you’re happily surfing the web and every now and then the connection drops. Maybe you find the light flicker down to nothing on your broadband cable modem and then abruptly all LEDs light up again.

Quick Fix: This is a frequent issue, especially for those who have cable Internet service or FIOS. You would not believe how often this issue results from a degraded signal coming to the cable modem.

If you use splitters, consider replacing them. In case you have many splitters within an inbound cable link, say one coming to your house and another to split out the cable signal in your home entertainment system, check to find out whether they’re -7dB splitters (printed on the exterior of the splitter).

Consider replacing a -7dB splitter your broadband modem is connected to using a -3.5 dB splitter. This may decrease signal reduction. Moreover, if you happen to get a three-way splitter and you’re not using the third link, consider replacing it with a two-way splitter.

I Forgot the Password to My Router

The Problem: You forgot the password to manage your router. Period.

Quick Fix: you need to reset the router back to its factory default settings, and you’ll lose all of your configuration settings. On the back of most routers, there is a recessed Reset button. Using a paper clip, hold down this button until the LEDs blink.

As soon as you’ve reset the router back to factory settings, you can use the default username and password.

Many current routers permit you to save the configuration settings so that you don’t need to reconfigure after doing a factory reset. Check to find out if your router has that capacity. If it does, save the settings today.

Internet Router Not Working

I Can’t Connect My New Wireless Gadget to My Router

The Problem: you’ve got a router that has been working fine. Your notebook and your computer can join it with no issues. However, when you get a new iPad, tablet computer, or handheld game for the holidays, sometimes that new device just will not connect. You know that it’s not an issue with the router, so what is happening?

Quick Fix: every time a new device will not connect to a router which you know is working, the first thing you need to do is make sure that there isn’t an issue with the device. Check to be certain that you can connect the device to a different network, possibly a wireless hotspot.

If the issue remains, check to ensure that your device is connecting to the perfect wireless signal in your router, for those who get a dual-band router.

Dual-band routers transmit signals at two groups: 2.4GHz and 5GHz. Some routers may use the same SSID for each group and then a few devices can connect automatically to the right band.

Just about all tablets, e-readers, gaming systems, etc can connect to the 2.4GHz band. Some newer wireless devices can connect to 5GHz.

Whenever I set up a router, I like to make sure I create different SSIDs for the 2.4 and 5GHz bands. This way I can control that device connects to that group. By way of instance, if I set up a Linksys dual-band router, I will name the 2.4GHz band”Linksys_24″ and the 5GHz band” Linksys_5.”

The Wireless Network’s Name/SSID Disappeared

The Problem: All of a sudden, your SSID or Wi-Fi domain is no longer recorded when you click to view available wireless networks. There are numerous reasons this might occur, and it is not an unusual occurrence.

Quick Fix: Force your computer or device to connect to the router even if it is not broadcasting. From Windows, go into Control Panel | Network and Internet | Network, and Sharing | Manage Wireless Networks.

If you see your wireless network recorded, right-click on its icon and click on Properties. Check the option “Connect even when the system isn’t broadcasting its name (SSID).”

Internet Router Not Working

If you do not see your wireless network listed, click “Insert” then choose” Manually connect to a wireless network” and place your wireless data in.

Mac users: You can even “force-join” an SSID that’s ceased broadcasting by using a Mac’s Airport Utility. Select to combine “Other” and type in the name of the password and network.

Needless to say, you still need to discover why your SSID stopped broadcasting. Check to make certain broadcasting wasn’t accidentally disabled in the router’s software, reboot the router, and check for any software upgrades.

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